Writing Satire Essays

Satire has been around as long as people have been. Have you ever really listened to some of the nursery rhymes? “Ring around the rosy, pocket full of posies. Ashes, ashes, we all fall down!” That was a satire in rhyme of the black plague! Or “Rock a by baby, in the tree top. When the wind blows, the cradle will rock. When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall. And down will come baby, cradle and all!” Nice little lullaby, right? Wrong. It was a political satire, in rhyme, about an illegitimate king and the planned revolution to unseat him. Often rhymes and fairytales were used as political satire when a government wouldn’t permit actual objections. Satire essays were also used to illustrate the anger or even the humor than some citizens felt toward those who ruled them.

Some people are good at satire and some are far from it. It isn’t hard to tell which is which, just look at political cartoons and listen to comedians and you can see where the satire is done best. Usually, if a student does not have a humorous outlook on life they would rather just buy an essay instead of having to do it themselves.

Satire essays are not necessarily only about politics. Almost anything can be used to make a satirical point. For example, if your employer has a particular habit or speech pattern that can be exaggerated, it’s easy to satirize when he or she does something worth the effort. Making employees work late when the boss leaves early can be satirized by the old saying “When the cat’s away, the mice will play.”

One of the best satirists of all time was Will Rogers. He was a comedian, writer, trick roper and actor. Born in the Oklahoma territory in the 19th century, his performing heyday was the 1920’s and 1930’s. He died in 1935, in an airplane crash. His humor and satire were funny and gentle at the same time. He’d often say “I’ve never met a man I didn’t like.” Little did he expect to be involved in satire even after his death, but it became a popular saying, “Obviously, Will Rogers never met you!” directed at an unpleasant person.

To create successful satire essays, it’s important to find something to say that isn’t downright hateful. A little exaggeration is acceptable and humor always finds a willing audience. The essays must contain enough grains of truth that they are relevant and not totally obscure, or you’ve defeated the whole point. But it doesn’t work well if it’s too blatant, either. There’s a fine line and the only way to understand the line and use it wisely is to know your subject well and phrase the words carefully. For example, it isn’t satire to call someone an idiot. However, you can mention that whatever the price was for their education was a waste of spare change. When arguing with someone that you don’t mind insulting, a satirical comment might be “Fighting with you is like having a battle of wits with an unarmed opponent.”

Satire essays can be great fun, if they’re done right. Depending on the requirements for essay length, this can be effectively done as a 250 word essay or much longer. The trick is to enjoy making fun of your topic.